To pre-registration trainee pharmacists

 

Important information about changes to pharmacist pre-registration training

 

At its November meeting, the GPhC’s Council made two decisions about pre-registration training which affect you. This email explains what the changes are.

 

1.      Standards of conduct, ethics and performance

From 4 December 2013, all trainees will be bound by the GPhC’s Standards of conduct, ethics and performance, which is the core standard for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians. This means that when you are training you must act in accordance with the standards. We will be contacting tutors to advise them of this change and we will be asking them to take the standards into account when evaluating your performance during your training. You can download a copy of the standards (and accompanying guidance) from http://www.pharmacyregulation.org/standards/conduct-ethics-and-performance andhttp://pharmacyregulation.org/standards/guidance.

 

As the standards now apply to you, you must know them well and understand them. We suggest you discuss them with your tutor and other people involved in your training.

 

2.      Investigating serious concerns raised about a trainee

From 4 December 2013, the GPhC will have a procedure in place for dealing with serious concerns about a trainee. By ‘serious concerns’ we mean concerns including those that have the potential to result in a breach of safety or patient harm or are criminal. Not many serious concerns are raised about trainees but you need to know about the new procedure in case it is applied to you. The procedure is not a substitute for concerns being investigated and addressed locally by you and your tutor/employer/superintendent, which is how we expect most concerns to be resolved.

 

If the GPhC receives a serious complaint about you, it will be investigated and then the GPhC may contact you, your tutor, your employer/superintendent and other relevant people or organisations to understand the concern better and to ensure everyone knows that a serious complaint has been raised about you. The GPhC may take no further action at this point or it might require you and/or your tutor/employer/superintendent to sign undertakings to restrict your practice for a specified period of time. The type of restriction will depend on the nature of the serious concern.

 

If you do sign undertakings when required to do so by the GPhC, it means that the serious concern has been acknowledged by you.  The GPhC will monitor your compliance with the undertakings. You must share the undertakings with your tutor and employer/superintendent.

 

If you do not sign undertakings when required to do so by the GPhC, you will be removed from the GPhC’s Pre-registration Scheme. This means that you training will cease to be recognised by the GPhC for registration purposes.

 

Note that the GPhC may investigate the serious concern again when you make an application to register. At that time, the GPhC will consider whether you have acted in accordance with the undertakings as part of a review your performance and behaviour during your pre-registration training. This investigation will be taken into account when deciding whether or not to register you.

 

The GPhC will become involved in investigating a serious concern if it cannot be resolved by you and your tutor/superintendent/employer. If you are aware of an issue which could be regarded as a serious concern, you must raise it at the earliest opportunity with your tutor/superintendent/owner and work together to resolve it. At all times you must be open and honest and cooperate fully with investigations involving you.

 

If you have any queries about these changes please contact the GPhC on 020 3365 3400 or at info@pharmacyregulation.org.

 

(2)    Email to pre-reg tutors

To pharmacist pre-registration tutors

 

Important information about changes to pharmacist pre-registration training

 

At its November meeting, the GPhC’s Council made two decisions about pre-registration training which affect your trainee. This email explains what the changes are.

 

1.      Standards of conduct, ethics and performance

From 4 December 2013, all trainees will be bound by the GPhC’s Standards of conduct, ethics and performance, as are you. This means that trainees must act in accordance with the standards while training. When evaluating the performance of your trainee you should consider whether they have adhered to the standards, and take appropriate action if, in your opinion, they have not. This may include raising concerns with your trainee, your employer/superintendent or other relevant people and organisations. If you have concerns about the performance or conduct of your trainee, they should be documented clearly in the 13/26/39/52 week appraisals completed for the GPhC.

 

You can download a copy of the standards (and accompanying guidance) from http://www.pharmacyregulation.org/standards/conduct-ethics-and-performance and http://pharmacyregulation.org/standards/guidance).

 

We have advised trainees to discuss the standards with you and other people involved in their training.

 

2.      Investigating serious concerns raised about a trainee

From 4 December 2013, the GPhC will have a procedure in place for dealing with serious concerns raised about a trainee. By ‘serious concerns’ we mean concerns including those that have the potential to result in a breach of safety or patient harm or are criminal. Not many serious concerns are raised about trainees but you need to know about the new procedure in case it is applied to your trainee. The procedure is not a substitute for investigating concerns locally by you and/or your employer/superintendent and we expect most concerns to be resolved locally. We have told trainees that they must cooperate fully with investigations involving them.

 

If the GPhC receives a serious complaint about your trainee, it will be investigated and then the GPhC may contact your trainee, you, your employer/superintendent and other relevant people or organisations to understand the concern better and to ensure everyone knows that a serious complaint has been raised about your trainee. The GPhC may take no further action at this point or it might require you, your trainee and/or your employer/superintendent to sign undertakings to restrict your trainee’s practise for a specified period of time. The type of restriction will depend on the nature of the serious concern.

 

Signing undertakings: your trainee

 

If your trainee does sign undertakings when required to do so by the GPhC, it means that the serious concern has been acknowledged by your trainee.  The GPhC will monitor your trainee’s compliance with undertakings and may contact you about this. You trainee must inform you that they have been required to sign undertakings and must share the undertakings with you.

 

If your trainee does not sign an undertaking when required to do so by the GPhC, your trainee will be removed from the GPhC’s Pre-registration Scheme. This means that their training will no longer be recognised by the GPhC for registration purposes.

 

Note that the GPhC may investigate the serious concern again when your trainee make an application to register. At that time, the GPhC will consider whether your trainee has acted in accordance with the undertakings as part of a review of your trainee’s performance and behaviour during their pre-registration training. This investigation will be taken into account when deciding whether or not to register your trainee.

 

Signing undertakings: you

 

If you sign an undertaking when required to do so by the GPhC, it means that the serious concern has been acknowledged by you.  The GPhC will monitor your compliance with undertakings. In the interests of transparency, you must share undertakings with your trainee and employer/superintendent.

 

If you do not provide or comply with undertakings, the GPhC may take further action.

 

Your employer/superintendent may be required to sign undertakings also.

 

The GPhC’s Council made this change in part because it is sensible for regulators to have a means of dealing with serious concerns when they cannot be, or have not been, dealt with by other parties but also in the wider context of promoting professionalism and patient safety in training, as highlighted in the Francis Report and other similar reports.